Human–computer interaction


HCI International 2019 logo

HCI International 2019, jointly with the affiliated Conferences, held under one management and one registration, will take place at Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Orlando area, Florida, USA.


HCI International 2018 logo

The HCI International Conference was founded in 1984 by Prof. Gavriel Salvendy (Purdue University, USA, Tsinghua University, P.R. China, and University of Central Florida, USA) with the 1st USA-Japan Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, and was held in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, 18-20 August. Since then, HCI International is held jointly with several Thematic Areas and Affiliated Conferences under one management and one registration. Nineteen HCI International Conferences have been organized so far (every two years until 2013, and annually thereafter).


"Improving the Quality of Life for Dementia Patients through Progressive Detection, Treatment, and Care" cover image

This paper provides a review of humanoid robots and mind control humanoid robots. Information was obtained mainly from journals and conference proceedings on robotics and mind control technology. We primarily focus on providing an overview of commercially available robots and prototype research-stage humanoid robots in addition to mind control humanoid robot systems. First, a history and overview of the humanoid robot is presented. Then, typical mind control humanoid robot systems are described, including the relevant brain-computer interface and the whole control framework.


"Improving the Quality of Life for Dementia Patients through Progressive Detection, Treatment, and Care" cover image

The prominence of dementia within the global aging population has undergone an increase in recent years. To improve the living conditions of patients, researchers must place more emphasis on early detection methods.


PhyCS 2017 poster image

Physiological data in its different dimensions, either bioelectrical, biomechanical, biochemical or biophysical, and collected through specialized biomedical devices, video and image capture or other sources, is opening new boundaries in the field of human-computer interaction into what can be defined as Physiological Computing.


ISO/TR 16982:2002 provides information on human-centred usability methods which can be used for design and evaluation. It details the advantages, disadvantages and other factors relevant to using each usability method.
Source: ISO


ISO 9241-910:2011 provides a framework for understanding and communicating various aspects of tactile/haptic interaction. It defines terms, describes structures and models, and gives explanations related to the other parts of the ISO 9241 "900" subseries. It also provides guidance on how various forms of interaction can be applied to a variety of user tasks.
Source: ISO


ISO 9241-400:2006 gives guidelines for physical input devices for interactive systems. It provides guidance based on ergonomic factors for the following input devices: keyboards, mice, pucks, joysticks, trackballs, trackpads, tablets and overlays, touch sensitive screens, styli, light pens, voice controlled devices, and gesture controlled devices. It defines and formulates ergonomic principles valid for the design and use of input devices. These principles are to be used to generate recommendations for the design of products and for their use.


ISO 9241-303:2011 establishes image-quality requirements, as well as providing guidelines, for electronic visual displays. These are given in the form of generic (independent of technology, task and environment) performance specifications and recommendations that will ensure effective and comfortable viewing conditions for users with normal or adjusted-to-normal eyesight.
Source: ISO


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