Stem-cell therapy


STEM CELLS Translational Medicine cover image

We previously demonstrated that subretinal injection (SRI) of isogenic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) reduced the severity of retinal degeneration in Royal College of Surgeons rats in a focal manner. In contrast, intravenous MSC infusion (MSCIV) produced panoptic retinal rescue.


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Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the most widely used stem cells of the human body due to ease of successful isolation and expansion for many years. In particular, from 2012 until now, MSCs have been widely clinically used to treat various diseases, including graft versus host disease (GVHD), Crohn’s disease, and knee osteoarthritis. In this review, the applications of MSCs in diabetes will be reviewed and discussed.


Indian Journal of Medical Research cover

Various stem cell sources are being explored to treat diabetes since the proof-of-concept for cell therapy was laid down by transplanting cadaveric islets as a part of Edmonton protocol in 2000. Human embryonic stem (hES) cells derived pancreatic progenitors have got US-FDA approval to be used in clinical trials to treat type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, these progenitors more closely resemble their foetal counterparts and thus whether they will provide long-term regeneration of adult human pancreas remains to be demonstrated.


Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences cover

Current therapies for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are symptomatic and do not target the underlying Aβ pathology and other important hallmarks including neuronal loss. PPARγ-coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is a cofactor for transcription factors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), and it is involved in the regulation of metabolic genes, oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial biogenesis.


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